What FIRE really means

Retiring Early and being financially independent may be a dream for many. But before you put too much romance into that thought, let me tell you something: It becomes a dream once it happens. But before that, it can get really tough.

Savings target

My plan is to retire with 45. That’s 6,5 years from now. A long time? Not at all. Let’s do some basic math:

6,5 years => 52 x 6,5 => 338 weeks.

IF you would look at your current situation right now, how much money could you save up every week? 20 Euros? 30? 50? 100? Even if you would save 100 Euros a week, after 338 weeks this would equal only 33,800 Euros. Hardly enough to retire on.

So my target is actually significantly higher, with a goal of saving approx. 500-700 Euros a week. For most people this may sound hard to manage or even to be complete madness. But yes, it CAN be pulled off. It’s just really, really hard.

Focus on your career

I work as a hotel manager and have a decent salary which contributes mainly to reach my target. However, becoming a hotel manager at the age of 36 while having started in the industry only when I was 29, was a pretty tough call. In order to get quick promotions and collect the necessary knowledge and experience, I managed during this short time-frame to work in Korea, Japan, China, Scotland, Germany and Thailand. When I took on a role, I learned as much as I could, and as soon as I noticed that there is something in my way of moving up the career ladder, I simply moved on. I didn’t care about where I go, what my initial salaries were and I had almost no personal life whatsoever.

To be exact, the hotel was my life. I didn’t celebrate my birthday with any of my friends back home for several years. I didn’t celebrate Christmas or New Years back at home, because this is mostly a super busy time in any hotel around the world and you just don’t get off for that. I had no time for a family and even regular relationships were mostly annoying because they would just slow me down and require me to compromise on my career choices. My luggage was (and mostly still is) a 7 kg carry-on plus my laptop bag and a couple of suits. I hate to check-in luggage. My point here is: You got to really push yourself to get this career that will help you in building up your savings and investments.

Save a lot and use your savings to invest – aggressively

In the last 3 years I started to invest in stocks on a larger scale. Basically, when I got salary, I would send 50-60% of it to my stock account right away, and leave just enough on my cash account to get through the month. While I have a high position and a high salary by now, I really hate spending money for things that simply don’t matter. And believe me, from my point of view, there are not many things that would matter.

I don’t collect stuff, I don’t believe in buying presents or gifts. I get headaches when I enter a shopping mall and stay there for longer than 20 minutes and most of my clothes are being worn until they literally fall apart. I upgrade my phone and my laptop once every 5 years (yes, it should be Apple products, other brands just won’t survive long enough), I don’t sign any contracts that would involve monthly payments. Netflix is currently the only exception.

Don’t compromise your savings, get a side-hustle if you need more cash

But most and of all, I focus on work. When I get short on cash, I don’t withdraw any money from my stock account. I go to http://www.upwork.com and find a quick side-hustle to earn a few quick Euros to cover the expenses that suddenly came up. If I can’t collect the money quickly enough, I will put it on my credit card, collect the points and pay it off immediately as soon as I can collect my side-hustle reward.

Credit cards can be tricky but also useful. Living now in Thailand for a while, I can honestly say that during the last 3 years I never paid for a movie ticket. I got enough credit card points to go in every week (if I wanted to) without spending a dime. This is mainly, because I put almost any of the necessary expenses that I have on my card – and pay it back as soon as my points come in. Avoid delays, because credit card interest can seriously jeopardise your finances, but collecting credit card points is a great way to improve the value of your spendings.

For the last 6 months, I have filled my weekends (and some nights) with writing articles for The Motley Fool GmbH (German subsidiary). Regular writing on the side helps me a lot to keep up with my goal and additionally, it helps me to stay up to date on financial topics and stock research for any future investments.

It can get really tough

Sure, my wife complains sometimes about not having enough time for the family. My hotel job covers me for 6 days a week (yes, only 1 day off per week) and I usually spend roughly 60 hours in the hotel – every week. Researching stocks and writing about them adds at least another 20 hours on top of it. So I am now at roughly 80 hours per week. Hell, that’s a lot. Seriously, it is.

BUT the way I see it, in 6,5 years from now I will have plenty of time for everything – until I die. That may be shorter than I think. Or significantly longer. Who knows. But I don’t buy the “living for the moment” mantra when it comes to finance. Yes, I may die a year after reaching my goal, but the much higher probability is that I will be around for another 40-50 years after that.

Isn’t it a better choice to be optimistic about your life expectation and to look forward to it, with the confidence of being financially independent? I think so. I believe so. And that’s why FIRE is for me.

If you can’t motivate yourself to INVEST your time, and to dedicate your attitude and career approach to this goal, then FIRE will be seriously hard to pull off. And probably remain just a dream.

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