The dividend season is coming!

As the calendar has continued to roll into March, we are quickly approaching the dividend season in Germany. While most companies in the US pay out a dividend every 3 months, German companies do so only once a year. One could argue about which system is better or worse, but that’s a topic for another discussion.

In Germany…

The majority of companies in the largest German Stock Exchange Index (DAX) is paying out dividends from April to June. Right on time before summer vacation, to ensure that we get the necessary pocket money to go on holidays. Well, or if you are smarter, to re-invest it.

Traditionally over the last years, right before the announcements for upcoming dividends will happen, share prices start to rise as analysts evaluate and predict the expected payouts. And despite challenges across the globe, 2019 does look like a great year again. To understand the significance of this season, you need to take a look at some numbers. The expectation for 2019 alone for the DAX companies is a total payout of 35 Billion Euros!

35.000.000.000

That’s the number. Can you even imagine to have something like this on your account? Well, most people can’t and most people will never come even close to it, so this doesn’t really need to be your target. But receiving a piece of that pie is definitely worth the effort.

This is even truer if comparing dividend yields with traditional saving accounts. While it is currently quite easy to find companies which offer a yield on your investment of 3% or more, most saving accounts will be still below the 1% margin. It means that even with a modest 3% yield, you can receive 3 times the money that you would get if it’s parked on a traditional savings account. Just think about that. This the reason why investing simply makes sense.

In Thailand…

Interesting enough, Thailand has 2 major dividend seasons as most Thai companies pay dividends twice a year. The first season is similar to the German one, between April to June. The second one is around September and October.

I didn’t write much about the Thai stock market yet as I am still gathering experience, but I am setting up a stock account for my wife. As you might have guessed, I prefer stocks over life-insurance. Interestingly, Thai companies offer much higher dividend yields across the board and while some might think that investing here is risky, the truth is that the risk is pretty much controlled.

Due to the close relationship between politics and business, major companies are pretty well protected and with the country growing and moving forward, their profits are almost on autopilot. I will write more about this at a later point, but for now, I am getting ready for the dividend season here as well.

Re-investing is the key to long-term success

Receiving dividends at much higher yields compared with savings accounts is a beautiful thing. Even more so is the fact, that many dividend-paying companies tend to increase those dividends year over year. Re-invest those payouts, and you will create the 8th world-wonder: The magic of compound interest. Or compound-dividend. This is the one and only true key for long-term success, which any average person can achieve with very little effort.

Regular, growing dividends will enable you to escape the rate race much sooner. Or, if you prefer to keep working, offer you a nice supplement to your monthly paycheck or retirement payout. While many financial advisors will discuss with you about the 4% rule and about taking out money from your savings/retirement account when you get old, dividends offer you a much better option: Not taking out any money at all. If you are invested long enough, you can receive dividend-yields of 5-6% easily without selling even 1 stock, thus being able to enjoy a great lifestyle until your last breath.

This is no hocus-pocus. This is the power of investing.

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