Dividend Stocks make your worries go away

Over the last couple of months, I have started to reduce my social media presence and to close many of my online accounts. My Facebook account has been deleted (I seriously didn’t miss it a single day), and the same thing happened to my Twitter account and AirBnB. As I move closer towards my goal of FIRE, I plan to reduce my social media presence to a bare minimum. In the end, this blog… and possibly also my LinkedIn account for business purposes shall remain. Most others will be got to go.

But speaking of LinkedIn, I have recently noted a larger amount of posts where people are actively and openly seeking jobs, while also publicly stating that they have been unemployed for a couple of months. Some of them even go as far as to explain that they can’t pay for their children’s schools anymore, or to pay rent and needed to sell their house or downsize their condos.

Some of those CVs out there that I took a look at are actually quite impressive. From experienced, well-traveled professionals who reached tremendous success over the years, to aspiring intellectuals who surely made an impact in their previous organizations. And yet it seems that while they grew older, their age outweighs their experience. It just gets tougher to get hired, especially when you reach your 50s.

Prepare yourself

There are tons of situations why and how you might lose your job. You could debate on what is right or wrong, whether something is fair or not, and who to blame for what happens. Or you can prepare yourself. I like to prepare myself because blaming and guessing or discussing the issue at hand will probably not solve my problem. At least not as fast as I need it to get solved.

For me, investing in dividend-paying stocks is one pillar that I use to build my protection on. Due to the nature of my job, I grew with this challenge in mind since the beginning of my career. Every year or two I have to find a new hotel to work for, or worry whether my contract gets extended. Working as an expat in Asia comes with tremendous benefits and financial advantages, but the price to pay is a huge lack of security. Because every contract is limited to only 1 or 2 years and most come without any retirement pre-cautions, one can never truly relax and consider things to go well forever.

This is why securing several independent streams of income is crucial, and why the idea of financial freedom has been engraved in my DNA. I got to prepare myself for the worst-case scenario. I am 39 years old now and just signed another 2-year contract. Looking at my colleagues and other professionals in my industry, I know that 45 is the magic number when things will start to get really tough for me. Therefore I need to be ready for that before this challenge kicks in.

Dividend-paying stocks are a great source of income

It takes some time to play out well, but dividend-paying stocks are an amazing opportunity to benefit from our financial system. Buying the right stocks can result in tremendous advantages and a strong, re-occurring source of income.

When I was significantly younger, I didn’t really understand the power of what appeared to me “small yields”. 2% or 3%… this means that when I put 1.000 Euros into some company shares, I will get only 20-30 Euros back every year? Laughable.

What I didn’t appreciate at that time, was that not only do these amounts compound over a long period but also that those well-run companies tend to increase their payouts year-on-year.

Why is this important? Let me give you an amazing example. Warren Buffett is invested in Coca-Cola for a very long period through his company, Berkshire Hathaway. Over the years, Coca-Cola kept increasing its dividend payout. Year on year. The result: The yield on cost for Warren Buffett is now a stunning 62%!

This means that every year the stock returns him 62% of his initial investment. Getting back to our investment thesis of 1.000 Euros, this means that every year now he gets 620 Euros back in dividend payments for every 1.000 Euros that have been invested.

There is no hocus-pocus there, it’s just very basic and simple mathematics. And coca-cola is not the only company out there with such stunning results. Look no further than the brands you know well: Apple, Starbucks, Microsoft, Daimler, Shell… the opportunities are endless.

Start investing and stop worrying

No matter what your job or your business is, setting up a solid stock portfolio with dividend-paying stocks is a smart thing to do. While you are still working, it will increase your income. When you have no job, it will secure your most urgent needs. And when you plan to retire, you might be able to do so without even touching your savings.

But even more importantly, having another stream of income will put your mind at ease. Because even if you should lose your job, you will still have cash coming in. You will be able to buy food, and if you invested enough even pay your rent or your children’s school.

What happens if there is a crash in the stock market? Keep your cool, lean back and wait. The most reliable dividend stocks continued paying dividends even during the worst time on the stock market. Shell i.e. never lowered their dividend since the II. World War! Of course, there is some risk to every company and every stock, but that is why you need to diversify and purchase several stocks of different companies.

Do this especially when times are good, so you worry less when times turn bad.

Disclosure: I own shares of Apple, Daimler, and Shell at the time of writing. This article doesn’t represent investment advice. Please ensure to do your own due diligence before making any investment decisions.

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