If you had your own business…

…how would you run it?

Many people dream of being their own boss. Making their own decisions. Dedicating their available time solely to their purpose, their passion and to their own, full benefit. But is this indeed the reality for an entrepreneur?

Well, as it is with everything, it depends. It depends on the type of business you want to run, on the size, reach, and scale, on your product or service, on your dependency of suppliers or contracted partners, on your team (or the lack of it), and on a thousand other points that may play a role once you decide to do your own thing. Most and of all, it will depend on your perspective and your definition of freedom.

Rule of a thumb is that the more people get involved, the more things get complicated. Whether it’s business partners, suppliers, contractors, your own team or your customers. With every person, every character who comes into play, you are losing some part of your independence.

Running a successful business means to serve others

I think it was Tim Cook who said it last year in a speech or an interview. “A truly successful product or service can only be realized by serving others.” However, serving others means, to a certain extent, to put yourself in the backseat, to figure out what those other people need and want, and to try to deliver it to them.

The thing is though that once you have a business, everyone becomes your customer.  The people who work for you. The people who work with you. And the people who buy from you. Those who work for and with you are called “internal” customers. Those who purchase your product and/or service are “external” customers. And your job as an entrepreneur is to serve them all.

Does this sound like freedom? It certainly is a step forward. By freeing yourself from a boss or a corporate structure, you will have definitely more freedom to make decisions. But at the same time, you will probably discover, that it is not what you might have originally imagined as freedom.

You will have more power when it comes to your decisions and it might feel like freedom in the beginning, when your company is small and easy to overview. But as your business grows and expands, your responsibilities grow with it. And with every percentage of growth, the percentage of your freedom starts to diminish.

The best of both worlds

Reaching financial independence means to me to stop trading time for money. Of course, I still need to have income, but I just don’t want to have to work for it. Not because I am lazy. I am a workaholic. But, as a great quote from Warren Buffett says: “If you don’t learn how to earn money while you sleep, you will have to work until you die.” And I definitely don’t want to end up that way.

There are several ways how this quote can be interpreted, but a realistic perspective is probably to assume that over your lifetime, your focus should shift from working yourself, to let others work for you. When you purchase stocks of companies and become therefore to a tiny part an owner of the respective company, you are doing just that.

As an investor and company owner, you start earning money by reaping the rewards of having other people working for you. And while you have to share these earnings with all the other shareholders, you are free from almost any responsibility towards both, internal and external customers. It is a pretty smooth way of becoming your own boss.

There are risks – but regular jobs bear risks as well

This is not to say that you wouldn’t have any risk. As a company owner, even to a small part, you carry the risk of realizing a loss if the company fails. Also, since your shares represent most probably only a tiny part of the company, you have hardly any vote in steering the companies politics or to contribute in any other way to its success – or failure.

But the degree of your freedom gets truly maximized. And the more different companies you invest in, the more your freedom is being manifested. As you diversify your portfolio, you automatically increase your risk protection and risk tolerance. Even if one company fails, if you have 20 others to support you, then your worries will be still limited.

This will become even more obvious if you draw a direct comparison with having a full-time job. When you invest, you can spread your investments over several companies and thus create multiple sources of income. If you have one full-time job, you are completely dependent on this single source of income. What happens if you lose it?

Food for thought

This is some serious food for thought. People who don’t invest will find a thousand reasons to tell you why investing is not something that regular people do. And they are right about that last part of that sentence. Especially in Europe, the amount of investors is surprisingly little compared to common folks who rely on their day-to-day jobs.

But those are the folks who get sleepless nights whenever companies start to talk about efficiencies, streamlining of processes, outsourcing, and globalization. Technological disruptions don’t excite them, because every disruption may put their livelihood in jeopardy. These are the people who constantly worry, and even more so as they get older.

And you can’t blame them, because these are the people who can’t come up with 500 Euros in cash even if any serious emergency appears in their life. I am not saying this to look down on anyone. I am saying this because people who never learned about how to handle money tend to end up in serious hardships. Despite having worked for 30 or 40 years, many fear that their retirement money won’t be enough to cover their rent and fill their fridge once they (have to) retire. We are not talking small numbers here. Surveys in Europe and the US show that the majority of our populations fall into this category.

This is in stark contrast to those who learned and understood that either having your own company or being a shareholder of another company, can significantly increase your chances for a worry-free retirement. There are no guarantees, but your chances are simply higher.

When it comes to human lives, things can easily and quickly get emotional. Investors, however, take the emotion out of the equation and simply calculate chances. Winning the lottery is not a valid form of retirement planning. Investing is. so when you get your next paycheck, put some part of it aside and start investing. Every single investment that you will do will put you a step closer to be a worry-free individual in the future.

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