4 Reasons not to invest – Having no money

A majority of people out there thinks that investing is not for everyone. A recent survey by Blackrock revealed some critical reasons across generations, and as for why people would postpone or even not consider to invest at all. My previous post was about the no. 1 topic from that list, the access to and understanding of financial information:

  1. Access to and understanding of information about investing
  2. Having not enough money to start investing
  3. Being too worried about one’s current financial situation (and thus being too busy to worry about the future)
  4. Being afraid of losing everything

When you look at the second and third point, they do appear to be connected with each other. And surely they are. So today we take a look at the point no. 2 & 3.

It takes money to make money

A popular phrase, but is it really true? As always, it depends. If you talk to entrepreneurs, they will most certainly say “no” to it. For entrepreneurs, all you need is a great idea, dedication and hard work to make money.

But this doesn’t sound like the right approach to me. The goal for me is to stop trading time for money. Hard work and dedication always require to do exactly just the opposite.

So when you talk to investors, it’s a different story. For investors, it’s all about having money and making it work for you. As Warren Buffett likes to say: “If you can’t figure out how to make money while you sleep, you will have to work until you die.”

In other words, you have to figure out a way how to make money without having to trade time for it. The professional term for this is “passive income”.

Investing is the king of passive income 

If you just type in Google the term “passive income”, the result might produce various topics for further research. The website “Good Financial Cents” has this list in petto:

  • Savings Account
  • High Dividend Stocks
  • Passive Real Estate
  • Betterment
  • CDs
  • Index Funds
  • Corporate Bonds
  • Lending Club
  • Rent Your Space
  • Start a Blog
  • Buy a Blog
  • Affiliatize a Blog
  • Online Course or Guide
  • Online Tasks
  • Online Rebates
  • Cashback Credit Cards
  • Sleep Studies
  • Advertise with Your Car
  • Rent Your Car
  • Rideshare Driving
  • Silent Partner
  • Buy a Business
  • Outsource Your Business

Feel free to visit the website for more details on each and every single point.

From all these opportunities, investing in dividend stocks is probably the most efficient one. This is for several reasons, the most important one being that it’s completely scalable without any extra effort. Of course you need money to get started, but that is it. The only thing you need to get and/or to increase your passive income is additional money. With every additional Penny invested in a dividend-paying company, you increase your annual income.

Now you might argue that you need to trade time for money to have those funds necessary for investment in the first place. And it is true. But from some point onwards, those dividends that come up every month, quarter or year, they can and will grow your account without you having to lift a finger. Dividends grow, get re-invested and compound. In the long-run, it’s the single least-effort-strategy to go with.

How much do you need?

The belief that you need a lot of money to get started is not wrong, but it is flawed. You can start with as little as 25 Euros a month. That’s less than 1 Euro a day. But of course, with such a small investment it would take a very long time to let it grow large enough to be able to retire on it. It’s not impossible, but it’s not something to rely on.

The more you invest, the more return your investment can create. So it is advisable to invest larger amounts and to keep that investment growing until you reach a critical mass that becomes basically self-sufficient. My target: Getting to 100.000 Euros.

100.000 Euros invested in high-yield dividend stocks, REITs and BDCs or even CEFs can create stable returns of 6% or higher – after-tax. That is equal to 6.000 Euros a year. 500 Euros a month. Once you get there, your stock-investment becomes basically entirely self-sufficient. Whether you put in an automated savings-plan or add/buy more stocks each month on your own. The money just keeps coming.

With the above mentioned yield on your investment, every 1000 Euros that you re-invest will add to your annual income another 60 Euros. Times 6, that’s additional 360 Euros a year or 30 Euros a month. So just after 1 year, your monthly return will already increase to 530 Euros on average. And it will keep growing at a higher pace after that, year on year, following dividend increases and the compounding effect.

And the best part is, that you won’t need to do anything for this to happen.

Not having money and being worried about the present

So back to the original point for people not investing because of not having enough money, or to be too worried about the present. I am certain that this is for many the case. But you have to overcome it and find ways to get started. Even if it starts with only 25 Euros a month.

I like to compare this kind of situation with education or training. For example: If you can’t read and write, and your family has no money, you might be forced to engage in low-skilled-labor jobs that will ensure your families survival. But, if you keep doing it without looking for ways to improve yourself, you will never get out of this circle.

If you, however, put in the effort to study and to learn new skills, even if it’s in the late hours after work every day, on weekends, public holidays, whenever you can squeeze out that extra hour, you will set yourself up to be able to take advantage of opportunities that may pop up in the future.

So yes, not having money and being worried is absolutely a valid reason. But success won’t come to those who don’t set themselves up to be ready for it. As Warren Buffett likes to say: “The harder I worked, the luckier I got.” Look where that got him.

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