There is a lot of “happy talk” from governments around the world promising a swift recovery and promoting a way back to a “new normal” on the immediate horizon. However, when listening to politicians we always need to keep in mind what their incentives are. Politicians have a vast interest in painting positive pictures because their positions and their re-elections might depend on it.

In times of crisis, it is better to listen to other voices, and in particular to businesses. Not to their press releases, which are also often overly positive to keep investors patient and calm. The more relevant information is flowing in the background: Are they hiring people or did they freeze their payrolls? Are research and development projects being continued? Did they request their financial partners to extend credit lines? Are assets being sold off or do they continue to add value with acquisitions? Are they scrambling to get through the crisis, or do they take the opportunity to eradicate weak-points in their business models?

You don’t need to DO the research

For large companies, you can trust that somebody is doing this research for you. Financial magazines, newspapers, analysts, online blogs. There is a lot of work being done by many people out there. All you need to do is to find this research, to read it, to evaluate it, and after reading a few of these sources, to form an opinion based on the information you received.

You can do this for individual companies, but as an investor, you definitely should do this for entire markets. The world’s most famous and successful investors read a lot, and the majority of what they read are assessments, opinions, and evaluations of products, services, trends, and opportunities.

People like Warren Buffett, Bill Gates. You don’t need to like them or to necessarily agree to their ideas and positions. But you should acknowledge that they have a significant amount of knowledge about what is happening in the world. They use this knowledge for their decision-making process, where to invest, which project to support. Which idea or business model, or charity offers the best chance of success, adding value to the market, to investors, and to potential customers or recipients of the product or service.

The picture is pretty bleak

Looking at what is happening in the markets right now, the picture is pretty clear. And pretty bleak. We are in a recession, one that might last a few years.

Almost every colleague of mine is on a salary cut, furloughed, or anxious that he might get into a challenging situation in the next few months to come. Companies in the travel sector are obviously heavily impacted, but also other sectors experience similar challenges. Job cuts, sales of assets, and project delays are mentioned daily basis in newspapers around the world. And while some economies started to slowly re-opening, cash-flows are still very far away from where they were in 2019. The numbers for the first half of 2020 will come in and will be reported in the next weeks to come, and it’s pretty safe to say that there will be some shocks ahead to those who kept listening to the happy talks of politicians.

All this doesn’t mean that you should stop investing

As I mentioned in a previous article, this could nevertheless be a great opportunity for investors. Every crisis has survivors and losers. And survivors usually come out stronger every time when they are challenged and pushed to improve, to re-invent, and to innovate. From my point of view, this crisis has pushed us into new investment territories by emphasizing the importance of sectors that were neglected in the past.

Technology is already a clear winner (again), but it’s worth taking a deeper look into it. Some areas of technology will shift into a stronger focus than others. Cybersecurity for example is such a sector. Work and freelance platforms are another.

Producers of hygiene products and business which focus on health & safety can expect long-term benefits for the years to come. But the same goes for companies which not many had on their radar like waste management systems, and water supply and filtration technologies. You know where all your germs go to every time you shower or visit the toilet, right?

Plenty of opportunities in every crisis

When you read enough, gather a sufficient amount of information and knowledge, and adapt your thinking to understand that there are opportunities in every challenge, then you will quickly realize that, crisis or not, there is no reason to ever stop investing.

The only limitation I would see is when you are running out of time. When you get old. But by that time, your portfolio should be the last worry you have. By that time, I would hope that you have had a successful investment history and that you can happily retire on your monthly dividend income.

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