We are now in the middle of the third quarter of 2020. August. And the world doesn’t look much better than it looked in the second quarter. In fact, despite all the happy talk that you might hear occasionally on some news, data points increasingly towards a bad fourth and final quarter as well.

So the pain will continue and might even increase. More companies will close their doors. More people might lose their jobs, or endure salary cuts. Many people will remain dependent on the support from governments, friends, families, or charitable institutions… and sometimes strangers.

The suffering is not equal

But some suffer more than others, and guess who is suffering the least? Well, from what I see, income investors have suffered very little in comparison to regular folks.

When I look at my income portfolio, it looks as bad as it gets with current total performance in value development of -29%. Almost a third of the money I invested has disappeared. On paper. In reality, it doesn’t disappear until I sell the shares – which I have no intention to do within the next 20 years or so.

But interestingly, my dividends for this year will be holding up much more stable. According to my most recent forecast, my dividend income for this year will fall only about -8%.

Cash is king

In a crisis like this, income investors have the advantage that most of their investments are/were around financially strong companies, which generate either strong cash flows or which are simply rich.

In addition to this, many dividend-paying companies tend to offer essential services. Whether it’s water, energy, food, or our most addictive tech-entertainment. Those companies keep earning money no matter what and can largely sustain their dividends even in a global crisis.

Having strong cash flows and/or a well-prepared emergency fund, those companies can navigate through the storm, and even use their strong cash position to grow and expand their business. One should not get surprised if the strongest among them come out even stronger after the crisis.

Technology is unstoppable

I have this year so far only added money to my speculative portfolio which has several technology titles in it that either benefit from the pandemic, or which are simply not relevant to the pandemic at all. And while my income portfolio shows a -29% performance, my speculative tech portfolio is already back up with double-digits and +25% in market value.

Some people are wondering why the technology sector keeps rising despite the harsh reality that we experience across the globe right now. But in fact, it’s not surprising. Technology will be moving forward no matter what, and being invested in a few solid technology-focused companies will probably serve as a great diversification to any portfolio for the foreseeable future to come.

Keep investing

So yes, I keep investing. I am currently not adding money to my dividend income portfolio, but plan to do so around October. August and September look still awfully bleak and we might see more bankruptcies, more unemployment, and more suffering. But the longer it will be going on, the closer we will get to a solution. I am, however, putting money into my speculative portfolio.

History has taught us, that after every crisis the market recovers. As a young investor, you should therefore not hesitate. Whether you go in with an ETF or individual stocks. Crisis or not, keep investing regularly, and diligently, and as we get closer to a solution to this awful pandemic, your efforts and trust in the market will very likely plan out according to similar events of the past and reward you in the long run.

There are of course no guarantees, but what is guaranteed these days anyway?

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