Who gets all the money?

As I mentioned in my last post, investing makes a lot of sense for people who want to retire earlier, safer, and with a higher degree of protection than one would have with a regular job. This is applicable to basically everyone.

I explained this with the distribution of all the freshly printed cash that is being pushed into our economy. This is especially true in times of a crisis as we are currently experiencing. The difference in the amounts of cash that ends up in the hands of ordinary people, and in comparison with how much of that money goes to companies, is astounding.

But don’t rely on my word for it. The ones who know about this best are obviously the ones who get all the money, and I recently stumbled upon an article in my Flipboard account about that topic that explains it further very well.

You can find the entire article HERE, but let me take out and quote the most important paragraph of the read:

“All the signs are that coronavirus will increase inequality even further. The government is accumulating debt to subsidise the wages of the employed and self-employed unable to work because of the lockdown. Businesses are taking out loans to keep afloat. This debt is being used to pay bills and rent to those who own assets.

The money goes to those who own assets

Now, The Guardian is not my favorite paper but every now and then there is a good article. This article also has some weak points that might be debatable, but in the essence, this paragraph as highlighted above explains it really very neatly. I underscored the key points above.

Governments are printing money, issuing bonds. Interest rates are being pushed down to make loans cheaper thus more attractive. And all this money, trillions of dollars and euros, is ultimately being pushed to and ends up with those who own assets.

It’s your choice to make

I know, it’s easy to get offended by this system. It’s easy to blame it for all the problems in the world. But as I learned early on in my career, complaining solves nothing. You need solutions. Just complaining for the sake of it doesn’t help anyone. You need to have a solution, some viable alternative. And the fact of the matter is that currently there are no alternatives to the system we live in that would assure us to end up on a better path.

Politics aside, everyone has a choice here. You can be outraged, you can complain, and you can think about alternatives, go into politics, and plan for a better future. Or do nothing.

But in the meantime, it might be smart to own some assets.

About multiple income streams

People all around the globe face unprecedented challenges. Well, at least it’s unprecedented for my generation (Gen X), and certainly for Millenials and anyone younger than them. Millions are losing jobs, are forced into quarantine. Many are in dire need of some kind of assistance, whether it’s cash, food, or both.

Here in Thailand, we just passed through the first month of the lockdown. When I drive through the streets of Bangkok or Pattaya where I am currently working, I see people lining up (with social distancing) for food support from the government and from some private institutions.

The Thai government is issuing cash support of THB 5.000 per month to those who need it most. It’s not much, but it’s enough to survive on a very low bar. Together with the support from private institutions, NGOs, and hundreds of those who are more fortunate and who are volunteering to support, I have no doubt that the country will get through the event.

I am also always astonished by the amount of support among Thais in times of crisis. My wife is getting postal packages from friends and family with food, face masks, and snacks. We pass on the favor by sending things to others who need it more than us. I am fortunate enough to still have my job and my monthly salary intact, albeit slightly reduced.

About income and unexpected situations

But not everyone is lucky. Similar to other places around the globe, unemployment in Thailand is on the rise on a massive scale. This is dire in a country with very limited governmental social protection in place, and where most people live paycheck to paycheck.

Which brings me to the main point: Unemployment means for many people to lose their only source of income. And we can see right now more clear than ever, how many people’s lives really depend on their job. Being without work and without an opportunity to find new employment within a short time has now turned into an existential threat for millions of people.

Also, only very few of them could have even imagined such a situation two or three months ago. Yes, some might have an emergency fund and savings to ride out bad times. But would they have expected that they can lose their job, their income, and their benefits within such a short period of time? Hardly.

Building up multiple income streams

This is where the lessons of FIRE become such a powerful reminder, because having multiple, passive income streams is what FIRE is all about! The whole point of becoming financially independent means not being dependent on your job.

Building up passive income streams is best done by investments. Sure, the stock market is crashing and we are sliding into a recession. But out of the 33 companies in my income portfolio, so far only one of them has canceled the dividend, and only two announced to reduce it for this year.

Thanks to this, I am never worried about losing my job. Sure, my monthly dividends can’t compare with my salary, but that’s not the point. The important part for me is that I won’t need to rely on government support and on charities. I will be able to fulfill my main responsibility of providing shelter, medical protection, and food to me and my family on my own.

Personally, this is a very important factor to me, as this defines my perception of freedom and independence.

Who gets the money

And just to add another layer of understanding of why investing is a safer bet than your job, let me explain here one thing. While our savings and jobs are being destroyed, a crisis like this also generates unimaginable amounts of money. While stock valuations may be nosediving right now, governments all across the globe are printing cash like there is no tomorrow.

And where does this cash go to?

In the US, every US national is receiving a one time check of USD 1.200. There are 328,8 Million people in the US, so this sums up to roughly 395 Billion USD. Yes, it’s a lot of money.

But you know who gets more? Companies. Especially the big ones. They get bailed out when they get in trouble, they receive grants, and the FED is reducing interest rates so they can borrow money almost for free.┬áThis may sound very negative, but I don’t mean it that way. That’s just how it works for plenty and a variety of reasons.

The important thing is that you have a choice to make. Do you stick to your job and when you lose it, wait for your one-time check of USD 1.200? Or do you invest, and build up multiple and passive sources of income?

Having the knowledge that governments across the globe will put significantly more effort into protecting your investments and your sources of passive income (in comparison with taking care of you directly), this shouldn’t be a complicated choice to make.

Black Swan Events

The world of finance has its own set of terms to describe whatever is happening in the market. And given the current situation, just talking about “Bulls” and “Bears” is not enough. Let me introduce to you another term. The Black Swan.

Black Swan events happen every now and then. Like now. Since this is a rare event, let me also do something rare. Let me add a visualization from my favorite visualization website, www.visualcapitalist.com to this post:

mm_black_swan_events_main-2

I love this website and I can only recommend anyone interested in understanding how the world works to be a frequent reader and/or to subscribe to their free newsletter. It’s awesome. And no, I am not getting any commission or compensation for writing this.

Having said all that, there is some great information on this graph. Let me point out one negative, and one positive.

First of all, on a slightly negative note, while the markets crashed heavily in recent weeks, there is still room to fall. It may be hard to imagine, but share prices might still not have reached the bottom. We certainly have not reached the same proportional drop as back in 2007/2008 during the financial crisis. In the long-term chart most investors who are more than 10 years in the market, are still very much in the greens.

Secondly, on a more positive note, we can learn here that every crash is followed by a recovery. Investors do well to keep their shares, not to panic, and instead to look out for opportunities to continue investing even as the crisis keeps evolving.

Is a recession coming?

This is a complicated question and there are many factors involved. But the chances are, in my humble opinion, pretty high. The current crisis is forcing major industries to shut down operations. Hotels, airlines, restaurants, bars, events… we are talking about millions of jobs worldwide. All the lost income, disappearing pay-checks, lost taxes, depleted savings accounts. We will feel the effects of this crisis far beyond the time when the Covid-19 Virus will take its place in history books.

Our entire world economy is based on consumption. People need to spend money to help us generate cash flows, profits, and to pay wages and taxes to keep this machine running. This won’t stop, but it will definitely slow down over the next couple of months. Therefore, it might very well be that we will have a couple of rough weeks or even months ahead of us.